Marshal Papworth Needs Your Help!

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Marshal Papworth calls for help in providing farmers with a sustainable future

Marshal Papworth Scholars

Sixth months after completing their 10 week training in the UK, the first students to undertake the Marshal Papworth Fund’s Short Course Scholarship programme have reported back on their success in implementing their new knowledge and skills in their home communities.

The Marshal Papworth Fund’s Short Course Scholarship programme is designed specifically to provide young farmers in rural areas of developing countries with urgently needed training in sustainable farming practices, to help them tackle the challenges of population growth and Climate Change.

A shining example of how this works in practice is Eliza Uledi from Malawi. Since graduating from the Marshal Papworth Short Course in 2013, Eliza has helped to develop a 7.7 hectare plot that now yields rice, maize, tomatoes and pumpkins in her home town. Development of the plot included Eliza working with 62 other farmers to assess the soil type for each crop, and recover neglected irrigation pipes and canals – using a number of skills that Eliza had learnt during her course. Eliza also worked with farmers to share some of the business techniques she had learnt in the UK, encouraging them to treat the farm as an enterprise.

Eliza said: “Things are going well, apart from planting our crops a little late and some rain damage, we have had great success. Each farmer has taken responsibility for a portion of the plot and we have been able to sell our produce in the marketplace and directly from the farm; making a profit of K950,000 (£103).”

Formed in 2001 as a registered charity, the Marshal Papworth Fund gives young people the opportunity to spend 10 weeks in the UK learning life-long agricultural and horticultural skills, which they can then share and use to improve farming practices in their home communities.

James Parrish, Chairman of the Marshal Papworth Fund said: “Developing the knowledge of farmers, by sharing new techniques is crucial in achieving a sustainable future for these communities. This self-sustaining, community education programme not only provides sophisticated farming knowledge, but also helps farmers develop business skills and self-confidence.”

Through the farm Eliza has improved the skills and knowledge of 62 farmers, who can now pass these valuable techniques on to their children. She concluded: “Marshal Papworth has allowed me to make a difference in my local community and my country. The original group of farmers are now starting their own small businesses, buying and selling fish near the lakes, trading vegetables, and investing money in new crops. This means that parents can now afford school fees, build better houses, and buy new clothes. They’re even eating better and feeling healthier.”

Marshal Papworth has already helped improve the lives of one hundred students from developing countries through its Masters Programme of one year MSc and MA courses, helping them to achieve their dreams and save local communities. To ensure a sustainable future for individuals like Eliza, the Marshal Papworth Fund relies on donations, and needs your help.

To find out more about supporting the Fund, please contact Sandra Lauridsen on 01733 363514 or email slauridsen@eastofengland.org.uk for more information. If you’ve enjoyed learning about us and would simply like to make a donation please visit www.marshalpapworth.com/information/donate.html

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Photo: High resolution image available upon request.

Media Enquires:
For more information please contact Kelly Allnutt, Conscious Communications, kelly.allnutt@consciouscomms.com; 01223 393 812; 07879 682 772; or Alison Taylor Alison.taylor@consciouscomms.com; 01223 393 812.

About Marshal Papworth:
Marshal Papworth is a charitable Fund formed in 2001 from funds bequeathed from Marshal Papworth, an east Anglian farmer. It is wholly managed by the East of England Agricultural Society. Through its scholarship programmes the Fund develops life changing, land-based skills, enabling students, from developing countries to facilitate sustainable farming within their own communities

 

 

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